Cheri Elson Sperber and Allen G. Drescher, Retired
SERVING ASHLAND AND SOUTHERN OREGON SINCE 1973
21 S. 2nd St. ● Ashland ● Oregon ● 97520
Info@AshlandOregonLaw.Com
541.482.4935
Blog

Dementia or Alzheimer’s?

People use the words “dementia” and “Alzheimer’s Disease” all the time, but it’s not that simple.  Dementia is an umbrella term for many kinds of issue dealing with brain failure; Alzheimer’s is but one form of dementia. 

Teepa Snow is a nationally acclaimed Alzheimer’s and dementia care specialist who teaches her students how a person with dementia perceives his/her world and how caregivers can best provide dignity and the best quality of life.

I invite you to watch this video and check out some of her others.  

Dementia or Alzheimer’s?

If you have any questions or comments, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Cheri Elson-Sperber, J.D.
Gray Matters Consulting
Cheri@GrayMattersConsulting.org
(541) 708-1147

The Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

Humans like roadmaps to help prepare us for what may be up ahead.  Here is an article discussion the Alzheimer’s Association’s “staging system” for Alzheimer’s Disease. While everyone’s journey is unique, this may be a helpful guide for looking at the big picture.

The Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

If you have any questions or comments, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Cheri Elson-Sperber, J.D.
Gray Matters Consulting
Cheri@GrayMattersConsulting.org
(541) 708-1147

Caring for the Caregiver

Being a care partner can be very difficult and often their needs are forgotten in the whirlwind of caring for the person living with dementia.  We, as the “outsiders” in the journey, may also find ourselves wanting to help, but not sure how to in the best way.

Here are some tips of do’s and don’ts to be truly helpful to a care partner:

  1. Surprise them with a meal – take out or delivery – it can reduce a lot of stress and show them someone is thinking of them, too.  If you cook in their home, be sure to leave everything as clean, or cleaner, than when you arrived.
  2. Remember the small moments – simply holding their hand, making them laugh, sitting with them can go a long way.
  3. Be patient, kind, and understanding if they are short with you.  No one can truly understand the stress of being a care partner and providing them with a place of understanding the love can be extremely helpful.
  4. Keep your word – if you promise to help them be sure to show up.  There is nothing more stress-inducing as a care partner than not being able to count on those who have committed to helping.

For more information and to look at an interesting blog, see The Wholistic Attitude.

If you have any questions or comments, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Cheri Elson-Sperber, J.D.
Gray Matters Consulting
Cheri@GrayMattersConsulting.org
(541) 708-1147

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